What is your natural hair color?

 Your natural hair color is an important factor in determining your season.

I emphasize “natural” because it doesn’t matter what color it is if it’s been artificially enhanced; coloring your hair doesn’t change your season, though it can definitely alter your perceived season to others. 

If you’ve been coloring your hair so long you can’t even remember what the natural hair color is, try to remember what the color was when you were around 6-13years old and use that.

Typically speaking, although there are exceptions, the hair colors below are USUALLY the following seasons:


Blondes


If you have golden blonde hair like Kate Hudson, you could possibly be:

  • Light Spring
  • Light Summer
  • Warm Spring.
  • Sunlit Soft Spring or Sunlit Soft Autumn



If you have ash Blonde like a young Farrah Fawcett, you might be:

  • Light Summer
  • Cool Summer
  • Dusty Soft Summer 

Brown/Brunettes



If you have light brown hair like Kirsten Dunst that gets warm highlights when you're in the sun, you might be:

  • Light Summer
  • Light Spring
  • Sunlit Soft Autumn



“Mousy” Brown hair with no natural highlights, like Calista Flockart are often:

  • Dusty or Smokey Soft Autumn
  • Sunlit or Toasted Soft Summer 


Naturally black hair usually indicates:

  • All Winters, Aishwarya Rai, above
  • Deep Autumn, especially for non-caucasian women
  • note: non-caucasian women who are neither Winter or Deep Autumn can still have black hair. It is the skin and eyes that are most important in identifying these people. 

Red Heads


Natural Redheads like Marcia Cross, are usually:

  • Warm Autumn
  • Warm Spring
  • Deep Autumn
  • Toasted Soft Autumn
  • Sunlit Soft Autumn
  • Sunlit Soft Spring

Hair color tip: 

Always try to stay within your Seasonal palette for hair colors. Nothing looks worse than a Cool Summer with naturally beautiful ash blonde hair who dyes it red. Or a Light Spring with naturally beautiful golden blonde hair who dyes it black.




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